At Home Learning: Honors and Portfolio Art

During this time of uncertainty we will develop a deeper understanding and methodology for At Home Learning. For the time being I’ve put together some cool activities. These are not currently required assignments, just fun stuff to consider.

WordPress Sites

Your WordPress sites have an option for Posts which works like a blog. This is what would show up first when someone opens your site. (you are reading a Post right now). We haven’t used these. You typically use Pages which are static places for your assignments. My thought is this would be a fun place to post images from my home learning activity suggestions. We could all see each other’s items and enjoy them together. Be sure to title your posts what they are according to the list below.

Pretentious Artist Statement 

I have long wanted us to parody the concept of the artist statement. If you read professional artist statements you might sometimes wonder what in the world are they saying? So I challenge you to write an artist statement that is as pretentious as you can get. I mean you are a superstar above all others. Remember our formula for writing one: three paragraphs describing your past, present and future relationship to art. It doesn’t matter if you will never make art again; just lay it on as thick and deep as you can. Use your thesaurus.

https://scottnaismith.com/art-speak-arty-nonsense-exposed/

https://bmoreart.com/2015/08/parody-and-the-state-of-the-artists-statement.html

https://ottawacitizen.com/entertainment/local-arts/artspeak-sucks-and-thats-putting-it-in-plain-language/

Involuntary Painting/Curbiture

I have always been fascinated by things I observe every day that, when photographed and cropped to maximize composition, are as beautiful as any intentional art. A few years ago I discovered a FaceBook group called Involuntary Painting. There is another group called Curbiture that is about the same concept. These groups all about this notion. I posted things in Involuntary Painting for a while myself. Ambler (and everywhere else) is rich with imagery. The key is to use your cell phone camera to crop what you see. For instance don’t take a photo of a rusty dumpster, zoom in to a composition. You can often do a series from the same object. Think about your imagery and what attracts you. Is it because of decay or detail. Note: this is not about taking pretty flower or pet photos. These will resemble abstract paintings and usually consist of layers of information such as the vocabulary list I shared with you. I posted the PowerPoint to Schoology with images and definitions. The words where Palimpsestic, Pentimento, Sous Rature, Asemic Marks, Abstract Comics, etc. I also made a site with my images you might look at. It is called davidtmillerfound. It is a WordPress site and I haven’t updated it in some time.

Installations: toys, household objects, tools, clothing, etc.

Google installation art for perspective and context. Create installations in your home, yard, wherever, using items you have available. Toys, household objects, tools, clothing, etc. are perfect. Think COMPOSITION.

Sasha Parker

Residential Still Life

Your home has many still life compositions available. You don’t need to be a decorator because it simply HAPPENS! Look around at shelves counters, closets, refrigerators, garages, basements, walls, etc. Play I Spy a Still Life and share it.

(Stone)henges

There is ceramics artist I recently discovered whose work I really admire. I find his work clever and different. His name is Glen Martin Taylor. I follow him on social media and over the past few days he has been posting what he refers to as Henges. These are household installations constructed from everyday objects based on the infamous Stonehenge. I think you will find them very fun!

Students at work

Lily

Ethan

Biggs James

Darren “Biggs” James, former WHS art student (class of 2015) has a solo show at Ambler’s Cellini Studios and Gallery. Show dates are September 6 – October 1. The show title is Chaos. Bravo Biggs!

Art Show 2019

 

Upper Level Art Class as an Academic Stress Buster